Parents’ words and Anxiety Disorder

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Your first day of school will be scary!

Parents’ words and Anxiety disorder: a series of Articles by Jeffrey Pella.

Articoli

Your first day of school will be scary!
English

Your first day of school will be scary!

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – Part 1 Anxiety disorders affect a range of individuals in marked and persistent ways. Unlike other clinical disorders (e.g. depression), anxiety disorders can begin to manifest themselves in early childhood, in some cases before a child is even ten years old. This is important

Your first day of school will be scary!
English

Your first day of school will be scary!

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – part 2 In part one of this series I briefly discussed the onset, prevalence, severity and course of anxiety disorders. I also highlighted some parental behaviors that are thought to encourage the development of shy and anxious behavior in children. In part 2 of this

Your first day of school will be scary!
English

Your first day of school will be scary!

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – part 3 During the second installment of this series, I discussed the tendency of anxious individuals to over interpret threat in the face of ambiguity. Further, anxious mothers’ expectations of their children’s struggles and their children’s own expectations of elevated vulnerability in these situations

Your First Day of School will be Scary!
English

Your First Day of School will be Scary!

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – part 4 Up to this point in the series, I have discussed why it is so important to further understanding of the development of anxiety disorders in children. I have also touched on the importance of various types of parenting styles which may increase

Your first day of school will be scary!
English

Your first day of school will be scary!

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – part 5 Throughout this series I have explained that parents of anxious children tend to behave in stereotyped ways. In  of this series, I highlighted the potential impact of fear inducing words on children. This installment will investigate the conversations that mothers have with their

Anxiety and Emotional Conversations between Mothers, Fathers and Children.
English

Anxiety and Emotional Conversations between Mothers, Fathers and Children.

Parents’ words and anxiety disorders – Part 6 Throughout this series, there has been a focus on the importance of mothers rather than fathers in the transmission of anxiety. There are many reasons for this; research has shown that mothers do in fact play a more central role in their

Parents’ Words and Anxiety Disorders – Part 7
English

Parents’ Words and Anxiety Disorders – Part 7

As we arrive at the seventh installment of this series, I feel it is appropriate to recapture the major points that have been explored thus far. First, why study anxiety disorders? Well, anxiety in adults and children is more prevalent than most people think. It also affects the lives of

The effectiveness of video feedback therapy – Part 4
English

The effectiveness of video feedback therapy – Part 4

Use of a control group to verify the effectiveness of video feedback therapy in training mothers how to better interact with their children.

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety
English

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety

Behavioral inhibition is defined as a trait characterized by shy, withdrawn, uneasy, vigilant, and restrained behavior.

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #2
English

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #2

Infants classified with behavioral inhibition continue to exhibit anxious and reserved behavior throughout childhood and into adolescence.

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #3 Retrospective Studies
English

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #3 Retrospective Studies

Features of Behavioral Inhibition mirror the symptoms of social anxiety and the relationship between the two has been examined empirically.

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #5
English

Behavioral Inhibition and Child Anxiety #5

After discussing background, retrospective, cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of behavioral inhibition, let’s summarize the findings.

The measuring and styles of mother-child attachment
English

The measuring and styles of mother-child attachment

This article provides a brief description of the characteristic behaviors of infants with different attachment styles and parental behaviors.

Depression, mothers, meta-analysis and attachment
English

Depression, mothers, meta-analysis and attachment

Research shows that it appears to be an association between maternal depression and infant insecure attachment.

Ansia, il trattamento più efficace: CBT e Approccio Transdiagnostico

Ansia, il trattamento più efficace: CBT e Approccio Transdiagnostico

Ansia: la CBT in combinazione ad “un approccio transdiagnostico” risulta il trattamento elettivo, efficace per la persona nella sua interezza.

The Effect of Maternal Anxiety on Mother-Child Attachment
English

The Effect of Maternal Anxiety on Mother-Child Attachment

Maternal Anxiety: Mother-child interactions in this context are qualitatively different from interactions seen in healthy mother-child dyads

Interview with Ron Rapee

Interview with Ron Rapee

Sandra Sassaroli interviews Ron Rapee, Professor of Psychology, Faculty of Human Sciences at the Macquarie University of Sidney, Australia.

Insecure Attachment and Internalizing Behavior
English

Insecure Attachment and Internalizing Behavior

Insecure attachment: Anxious/resistant children may be at a higher risk for the development of anxiety disorders.

Anxious/Resistant Attachment and Internalizing Behavior Problems
English

Anxious/Resistant Attachment and Internalizing Behavior Problems

I will review two studies that examined the insecure attachment classifications in relation to the development of internalizing disorders.

Mother-child attachment and the development of disorders – Inconsistent results
English

Mother-child attachment and the development of disorders – Inconsistent results

No significant difference was found between children with an avoidant and resistant attachment style.


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